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sprechblase_leer.gif Please note that, unless otherwise specified, the sessions will be held in English.
In the room Singapore the sessions will be simultaneous translated into German.

Chairs of the day: Florian Grossmann & Rebekkah Middleton

08:0008:30
Room: Foyer

Registration

08:3008:45
Room: Singapore

Welcome Day 3

08:4510:00
Room: Singapore

Keynote 5

Learning to improve: challenging context and culture

Description

Aim: This presentation will explore the way in which the many cultures found in any context, impact on the healthcare teams ability to deliver effective Person-Centred practice.
Background: Internationally the challenge and complexity of changing healthcare practices for enhanced patient care is the focus of much attention. Contemporary literature suggests that practice is greatly influenced by the environment or setting in which it takes place (context). Context has been identified as a multi-layered construct that brings together issues of culture, leadership, behaviours, and relationships.
Design: Drawing on the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework, with its three key elements of evidence, context and facilitation, this presentation will explore ways to identify issues in practice and consider what is required to assist practitioners to make sustainable changes in practice.
Outcome: Holistic facilitative leadership and the creation of psychologically safe spaces are required to cultivate a climate in which individuals and groups feel safe to engage with the challenge of exploring their practice. Consistent, strong, facilitative leadership and authentic collaborative working are imperative if healthcare teams are to more effectively use evidence-based practice and undertake appropriate actions to enhance person-centred practices. 

Dr Donna Brown

Dr Donna Brown

Donna is Lecturer of Nursing, Course Director for BSc(Hons)/PGDip/MSc Developing Practice in Healthcare Programme, and member of Person-Centred Practice Research Centre, Ulster University. She initiated the Acute Pain Service in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, in 1993, and continued to work in pain management as a lead nurse for pain services across the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, a position she held until August 2013. Donna’s commitment to developing nursing practice, education and research has been evident throughout her career. She completed her PhD in 2008 using an Emancipatory Action Research approach to explore the impact of culture and context on pain management practices with older people in acute care settings. Donna has influenced the development of education and research programmes in terms of pain management, person-centred practice, practice development and facilitating learning in practice. 

10:0010:30
Room: Foyer

Coffee break

10:3011:30
Room: several rooms, click link below for details

Parallel Session 5

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11:3012:30
 

Home Group

The focus of Day 3 is Facilitating inter-generational person-centred cultures. The keynote, workshops and presentations will build on this theme. The Home Group is a time to pause, reflect and connect with others, taking the opportunity to learn from and with each other.

12:3013:30
Room: Foyer

Lunch / Meet the Experts

13:3014:30
Room: several rooms, click link below for details

Parallel Session 6

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Updated time 14:4015:40
Room: Singapore

Keynote 6 / Reflexion

PRACTICE DEVELOPMENT: Flowing between the known and the yet to be known

Description

Practice development has a long and well-established history in nursing and healthcare. Emancipatory and transformational practice development methodologies have helped to inform significant changes to the practice cultures in healthcare settings globally. The International Practice Development Community (IPDC) has been at the heart of these developments and indeed IPDC collaborators have significantly designed and shaped these methodologies. Since the inception of practice development methodology in the 1980s, the healthcare landscape has changed enormously and so have the methodologies that guide practice change. Most significantly, quality improvement (QI) has become the ‘methodology of choice’ (or indeed the only methodology!) in many healthcare organisations for bringing about changes in practice. Whilst having an impact on patient safety and practice consistency, QI methodology has had a limited impact on the development of person-centred cultures of effectiveness – the core goal of emancipatory and transformational practice development. The recognition of the need for both methodologies continues to be a challenge in healthcare organisations where the emphasis is on targets, key-performance indicators, compliance and surveillance.

So, what is the future for practice development and how do we flow into a yet to be known reality? This conference presents an opportunity for exponents of practice development to come together to reflect on the present reality (the known) to inform a future (the yet to be known). This keynote will challenge some existing thinking about practice development, QI and organisational cultures of surveillance. Drawing on the essences from shared conversations among ‘home groups’ at the conference, we will engage in a shared reflective engagement to identify key pillars of activity that can help shape a future for practice development that is ‘yet to be known’.

Professor Brendan McCormack

Professor Brendan McCormack

Head of the Division of Nursing; Head of the Graduate School; Associate Director, Centre for Personcentred Practice Research, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. Professor II, University College of South East Norway, Drammen, Norway; Extraordinary Professor, Department of Nursing, University of Pretoria, South Africa; Professor of Nursing, Maribor University, Slovenia; Visiting Professor, Ulster University. Brendan’s internationally recognised work in person-centred practice development and research has resulted in successful long-term collaborations in Ireland, the UK, Norway, The Netherlands, Canada, Australia, Slovenia and South Africa. His writing and research work focuses on person-centred practice, gerontological nursing, and practice development and he serves on a number of editorial boards, policy committees, funding panels and development groups in these areas. He has a particular focus on the use of arts and creativity in healthcare research and development. Brendan has more than 600 published outputs, including 190 peer-reviewed publications in international journals and 10 books. He is the ‘Editor Emeritus’ of the “International Journal of Older People Nursing”. Brendan is a Fellow of The European Academy of Nursing Science. In 2014 he was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing, awarded the ‘International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame’ by Sigma Theta Tau International and listed in the Thomson Reuters 3000 most influential researchers globally. He is currently in the top 100 ‘most cited’ nurse researchers globally. In 2015 he was recognized as an ‘Inspirational Nursing Leader’ by Nursing Times (UK nursing magazine) and in 2016 made a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

Updated time 15:4016:00
Room: Singapore

Handover to EPC 2020 Team + Closing Note

16:0016:30
Room: Foyer

Coffee to go