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sprechblase_leer.gif Please note that, unless otherwise specified, the sessions will be held in English.
In the room Singapore the sessions will be simultaneous translated into German.

13:3014:30
Room: Singapore

Creative Space ICOP

02.01.01

Creative space

Celebrating Person-centredness: International Collaborations through a Community of Practice

Description

Focus: In this session the ‘International Community of Practice for Person-centred Practice’ (ICoP) will present an overview of the work of the ICoP and how we are advancing knowledge in the field of person-centredness. Approaches to person-centred theory and practice continue to grow and there is much scope in creatively developing global partnerships to advance knowledge. In addition, practices continue to evolve and it is important for us to engage in dialogue about such changes and identify new ways of supporting, researching and educating about these ways of working. The ICoP exists to advance such theory and practice through dialogue and partnership working. Over the lifetime of the ICoP we have focused on research into particular theoretical approaches, creative methods of evaluation, developing measurement tools and processes and developing evidence to support practice at individual, organisational and strategic levels. In this session we will present this work and engage in a critical dialogue about future directions for person-centredness.

Professor Brendan McCormack

Professor Brendan McCormack

Head of the Division of Nursing; Head of the Graduate School; Associate Director, Centre for Personcentred Practice Research, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. Professor II, University College of South East Norway, Drammen, Norway; Extraordinary Professor, Department of Nursing, University of Pretoria, South Africa; Professor of Nursing, Maribor University, Slovenia; Visiting Professor, Ulster University. Brendan’s internationally recognised work in person-centred practice development and research has resulted in successful long-term collaborations in Ireland, the UK, Norway, The Netherlands, Canada, Australia, Slovenia and South Africa. His writing and research work focuses on person-centred practice, gerontological nursing, and practice development and he serves on a number of editorial boards, policy committees, funding panels and development groups in these areas. He has a particular focus on the use of arts and creativity in healthcare research and development. Brendan has more than 600 published outputs, including 190 peer-reviewed publications in international journals and 10 books. He is the ‘Editor Emeritus’ of the “International Journal of Older People Nursing”. Brendan is a Fellow of The European Academy of Nursing Science. In 2014 he was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing, awarded the ‘International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame’ by Sigma Theta Tau International and listed in the Thomson Reuters 3000 most influential researchers globally. He is currently in the top 100 ‘most cited’ nurse researchers globally. In 2015 he was recognized as an ‘Inspirational Nursing Leader’ by Nursing Times (UK nursing magazine) and in 2016 made a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

13:3014:30
Room: Rio

Concurrent Session 7

02.02.01

Oral presentation

A person-centred co-design approach to advancing facilitation:Outcomes of an advanced facilitation program.

Rebekkah Middleton

Description

Skilled facilitation is key to the success of practice development.  Using a person-centred approach to facilitation is an essential aspect of engaging stakeholders, ‘working with people’ rather than ‘working on people’ through the change process and in supporting systematic approaches to enhancing the practice context. Facilitation centres on co-producing knowledge using critical reflection and critical conversation and supporting learning in and about practice. Those who facilitate are enabling others to grow. But how do facilitators themselves further develop their skills, strengthen their theoretical knowledge, evaluate their own facilitation and advance the art and science of facilitation practice?

The International Practice Development Collaborative (IPDC) provides foundational facilitation skills through its 5 day program. There was however nothing to challenge and support those seeking to enhance their facilitation skills beyond this foundational course. An IPDC working party was formed in 2017 to address this gap. The group worked together to develop a principle based program focusing on advancing facilitation skills within the context of person centred practice. The pilot of the program was delivered in Wollongong, Australia using a 2day-1day-1day model, with twelve participants commencing October 2017 and ending in February 2018.

This presentation will explore how a person-centred co-design was used to develop, implement and evaluate the pilot program. The experiences of those facilitating and those participating in the program will be explored through the key themes of building knowledge around theories of person-centredness, critical social theory and facilitation, understanding the role of critical reflection as an advanced facilitator, participating in the co-design of the program, being person-centred, achieving learning and development outcomes, and exploring  ‘new frontiers’ of facilitation and how the participants themselves could shape and contribute to the evolving art and science of facilitation.

Rebekkah Middleton

Rebekkah Middleton

02.02.02

Oral presentation

The Journey to Embodying Facilitation

Margaret Kelly

Description

Facilitation is key to engaging people in transformational change and creating sustainable person-centred healthcare environments. However, a thorough understanding of the nature of skilled facilitation and how people gain expertise remains elusive.

This paper will present findings from a doctoral study that investigated the experiences of practice development facilitators, exploring their understanding of transformational facilitation and developing expertise.

In-depth interviews were held with 22 facilitators who were using practice development approaches to support transformation of workplace cultures. The facilitators were recruited from 6 countries and their experience ranged from novices to those who were considered highly skilled. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using a 3-phase approach.

Seven overlapping and interacting themes were identified that arranged into 3 distinct clusters:

1.      Internal to the Facilitator:

  • Inside your own head
  • Walking a fine line
  • Being me

2.      External to the Facilitator

  • A lens on facilitation
  • Making sense of theory

3.      Enacting transformational facilitation

  • Being fluid
  • Understanding people in context

There was evidence of a spectrum of development from early experiences as a facilitator through to being highly skilled. The spectrum reflected the way in which facilitators’ thinking, processing and practice changed as they gained expertise.

This doctoral study provides a clearer understanding of skilled transformational facilitation and highlights the ongoing nature of development. The findings have implications for up-and-coming facilitators and experienced facilitators who enable and support them to develop. It highlights the importance of a range of strategies used to support the continuing development needs of all facilitators and the ways in which these are utilised.

Margaret Kelly

Margaret Kelly

13:3014:30
Room: Nairobi

Creative Space 4

02.03.01

Creative space

From Root to Fruit – Flourishing in Change.

Caroline Dickson

Description

This creative presentation will explore leading and leadership within practice development in end of life care. We will be exploring the use of transformational practice development (PD) as a PD team transitioned through both role and management changes. Recent research demonstrates that creating a workforce that feels engaged, empowered and inspired will help achieve strategic outcomes whilst also ensuring that patients receive high quality care and remain at the heart of everything (McCance et al. 2015; McCormack and McCance 2017).

 

During the transition into their new Practice Development Facilitator (PDF) role, Marie Curie partnered with Queen Margaret University to create a programme of development which would enable PDFs to be pivotal in embedding cultures of person-centred practice. The programme was intended to address some of the strategic challenges in a way that fit with the Marie-Curie vision. It would also contribute to wider work of developing a culture of person-centeredness across the organization.

 

During our interactive presentation, we will show process and end-point programme outcomes and give examples of how these were achieved.  i We will outline our journey from the beginning where the team learned about PD principles and person-centred practice through the process of active learning (Dewing 2006).  How they agreed shared values came to know themselves through being with others, knowing others and taking time ‘to be’ rather than always being busy doing. We will share how critical reflection, and critical creativity were mediums which enabled growth of themselves as facilitators of person-centred practices.

 

During the creative presentation space, we will explore the challenges and successes of this continued work and share with other delegates how we would envisage further developments from person-centred moments to a culture of person centeredness where people who are at the end of their life are receiving care.

Caroline Dickson

13:3014:30
Room: Mexico

Creative Space 5

02.04.01

Creative space

Leading the process of co-production to ensure user involvement with a municipality - HOW?

Ragnhild Steinsland

Description

Co-production of knowledge is a current form of user involvement to improve and develop health care services. Doing research with persons and not on persons, means that stakeholders will be involved in all stages of the research process. This is especially a demanding task for project leaders when involving so many different stakeholders. These stakeholders and participants are: users (older persons living with dementia and their relatives), staff in home care services, municipality leaders (political and home care leaders), user organizations and professional organizations. This presentation is based on an ongoing co-production of knowledge project called MEDVIRK DEM. The MEDVIRK DEM project is a co-designed project involving different positioned stakeholders in a small municipality in Norway to ensure user involvement and relevance. The aim of the research project is to gain knowledge on “what matters to older people living with dementia at home”. Furthermore, the overall aim of the project is to innovate and develop the care services in line with the older persons and their relatives` preferences in co-operation with the municipality leaders.
In order to gain knowledge of “what matters to you” a combination of focus group interviews and individual interviews will be used. In addition, participant observation will be used to gain knowledge of the collaboration process involving the different stakeholders.
The aim of the presentation is to engage the audience in a creative session to explore how we can engage the leaders and different positioned stakeholders to ensure user involvement beyond tokenism.

Ragnhild Steinsland

Ragnhild Steinsland

13:3014:30
Room: Hongkong

Creative Space 6

02.05.01

Creative space

Development of 3D complexity project model

Kristin Ådnøy Eriksen

Description

Background. In a show in tell display in the conference we present a dynamic 3 D model of the complexity of a Practice Development project. The model represents a map of a complex project. We have found it useful in planning projects, in untangling confusing processes and in deciding areas for evaluation and research. The model is dynamic, and can be adapted to different project. Experience has shown that it changes slightly depending on the context. 

Participants in a Practice Development conference in Norway developed the model. And in the Creative Space we would like to invite participants in the EP-conference to continue this development.

Activities in Creative Space. Step one will be to use a 3D-version and explain the model to the participants. Step to will be to give the participants a representation of the model on a sheet of paper, and ask them to adapt the model to their own project. Third step will be sharing and discussion in groups asking questions like: -is the model useful? -why or why not? –what is missing? Fourth step is to provide additional material and invite the participants to explore and elaborate the model (either in groups or together, depending on the number of participants).

Aim. In this way we hope to explore how the model can be utilized and refined. And at the same time that we and the participants can learn more about how to understand and handle the complexity of Practice Development processes. We believe it will be possible to understand more about how elements in projects may relate to each other, see examples of how people have planned evaluation and research, and gain insight in different contexts the participants represent.

Kristin Ådnøy Eriksen

Kristin Ådnøy Eriksen

13:3014:30
Room: Guangzhou

Creative Space 7

02.06.01

Creative space

Using creative self-expression to develop cultural competency in hospice-care for the homeless population

Namarig Ahmed
Jasna Schwind

Description

Three community care organizations in Toronto, Canada, partnered to build a hospice for those experiencing homelessness and a life-limiting diagnosis. A vital component of the project was to ensure that hospice leaders, caregivers, and volunteers would receive comprehensive and meaningful training in cultural competency when working with the homeless, who also require palliative care. We first engaged the caregivers and clients with lived experience in traditional focus-group interviews to elicit their input on the provision of person-centred care at the new hospice. We additionally wanted to develop hands-on training, which would be more impactful than the traditional task list, for future hospice leaders, caregivers, and volunteers. To access a more holistic understanding of what the new hospice care could look like, we adapted Schwind’s Narrative Reflective Process (NRP), a creative self-expression tool, which includes storytelling, metaphors, drawing and letter-writing. Those with experience of living in homelessness, and those who work with this population, were invited to engage in the second set of focus-groups, where they shared stories of being cared-for, drew images of their care-metaphor, and they wrote letters (clients wrote to hospice caregivers, and caregivers wrote to new staff). The combined outcome of focus-group interviews, was more holistic and meaningful. From the traditional interviews we learned the expected, professional steps in hospice care. However, from the creative focus group interviews, we experienced a humanistic response, that was authentic and passionate, from both caregivers and clients. Following these activities, we analyzed their responses using Narrative Inquiry approach, and crafted a series of vignettes on caring, a composite story, and a poem, using participant voices, respectively. Using the outcomes of both traditional and creative focus-group interviews, we developed a creative and meaningful cultural competency interactive training for the new hospice leaders, caregivers, and volunteers, which was received with great commendation. 

Namarig Ahmed

Namarig Ahmed

13:3014:30
Room: Osaka

Concurrent Session 8

02.07.01

Oral presentation

Leading, Managing and Facilitating with a Divided Brain

Ross Clifton

Description

This session will explore key aspects Iain McGilchrist’s understanding of the divided brain as outlined in his seminal work “The Master and his Emissary”. I will explore this framework from organisational and clinical perspectives, particularly the relationship between leadership, management and facilitation and the opportunities and threats related to person centredness.

McGilchrist introduced a story where a lady was informed of her brother having passed away in a mining accident. She saw her brother in the hospital morgue and bent down to kiss him. Feeling that he felt still warm she also thought she could sense a weak pulse and immediately approached the nurse standing close by who replied “Don ‘t you worry about that my dear, it says quite clearly on this piece of paper that he’s dead” and turned away. The sister then ran to find a doctor who administered intracardiac adrenaline and the brother still lives.

Here the formal, the virtual, the bureaucracy (the left brain) can matter more than what is more humanly experienced. What kind of clinical environments have been created where the opposite of person centredness (more right brain) is being espoused?

This divided brain framework will be used to explore a range of themes at individual, team, organisational and community levels to facilitate a practical understanding of metaphors associated with both sides of the organisational and individual brain such as: the dualities of impersonal and personal; the relationship of management and leadership (and facilitation); creative innovation and conformity; organic development and strict controls; quantitative (the what) and qualitative (the how) processes; and, virtual representations and the ‘mechanisation’ of care versus ‘real’ personalised experiences.

There will also be the opportunity to further explore the clinical impacts and opportunities in key areas such as power relationships, systems and processes, technology, values based leadership/management, innovation, change, organisational culture, relationship management and effective communication.

Ross Clifton

Ross Clifton

02.07.02

Oral presentation

Adapting to Local Context to Advance the Health of Populations: Implementing a People-centred BSCN Curriculum

Shelley Cobbett

Description

A new, people-centred BSCN curriculum admitted the first students in September 2016, with the first cohort of students, advanced standing, graduating in October of 2018. The purpose of this presentation is three-fold: to share the philosophical underpinnings of the curriculum, including people-centredness, health and social care, and professional transformation; to illustrate application of practice development within the curriculum; and, to highlight the importance of a developmental evaluation framework to enable “changes on the fly” during implementation. The underpinnings of the curriculum are based upon educational theory (Fink, 2013; Gardner, 2008) and direct that learning be equally focused on the creative mind (Gardner, 2008), as well as the discipline, synthesizing, respectful and ethical minds (Gardner, 2008).  Fostering growth in each of these five minds maximizes opportunities for creative potential to emerge in the learning environment, contributing to active, engaged significant learning. A reincarnation of the concept of “team teaching”, which was common in nursing education in the 1970s and 1980s, enabled the school to share the expertise of faculty and adjunct appointees across the undergraduate program and provided more opportunities for faculty to role model respectful and healthy debate of ideas. The creation of a nursing practice foci certificate within a generalist BSCN degree will be outlined, with successes shared from a collaborative relationship with our service sector partners, as an exemplary example of adapting to local context, ultimately improving the health of the local population.

Shelley Cobbett

Shelley Cobbett

13:3014:30
Room: Samarkand

Concurrent Session 9

02.08.01

Oral presentation

Critical Companionship and leadership – I couldn’t have done it on my own

Catherine Schofield

Description

Using Titchen’s Critical Companion (CC) domains, Relationship, Rational Intuitive, Facilitation and Use of Self I will examine a particular CC relationship that has been developed and deepened over the last 10 years.

From our initial collaboration in opening the first forensic mental health unit in Tasmania we have maintained a close professional working relationship. This relationship has been one of overt critical companionship that has seen us both flourish and gain influence within the Tasmanian health system.

The relationship has been underpinned by an ongoing commitment to the pursuit of excellence, person centred practice, taking risks and opportunity and championing the involvement of our consumers while never taking ourselves too seriously.

This presentation will be a reflective piece on the key elements that have influenced the way in which we work together and the development of both our professional relationship and personal friendship.

Authentic leadership must be an ability to examine ideas, motives, attachments, fears, risks and opportunities critically, creatively and supportively. Critical companionship provides an ideal model where this can and does occur.

 

Catherine Schofield

Catherine Schofield

02.08.02

Oral presentation

Practice Development in Clinical Leadership Programmes - what works best for whom, when and why?

Helen Stanley

Description

Clinical Leadership has a key role globally in both high quality patient care and quality improvement (Bender et al 2016, Mianda and Voce 2017). Strong and effective clinical leadership is one of the most influential factors in transforming organisational culture (West et al 2015). Clinical leadership development in the past has focused on enabling participants to develop their leadership skills through participating in leadership programmes and despite vast investment made in leadership development, there is little understanding or robust evidence of the impact or what learning or practice development strategies are effective in Clinical Leadership Programmes (ibid).

Method:

Realist Evaluation (Pawson and Tilley 2004) was used for Phase 1 of this PhD study to identify relationships between context, mechanisms and outcomes to identify what impact, and in what ways, specific learning and practice development strategies within a Clinical Leadership Programme have on workplace culture and person-centred practice. This approach underpins the UK NHS Leadership Development Evaluation Framework (Health Education England 2017).

Results:

A concept analysis (Rodgers 1989) clarified the defining attributes, enabling factors and consequences of Clinical Leadership across health professions, alongside a realist review of Clinical Leadership Programmes (Saul et al 2013), outlining the context of the programmes, highlighting the mechanisms of the learning and practice development strategies and defined the outcomes to explore relationships between interventions used in the programmes of the impact on workplace culture, for individuals, teams, service and organisations. Together, this phase of the study generated an initial programme theory whereby successful programmes were embedded in the organisation delivered in the workplace, utilised interprofessional, reflective, experiential learning and creative practice development strategies.

The international implications for individuals, teams and the service/organisation in developing Clinical Leadership Programmes, workforce culture and person-centred practice will be critically explored to contribute to the theory of impact of practice development (Manley et al 2011).

 

 

Helen Stanley

Helen Stanley

13:3014:30
Room: Miami

Concurrent Session 10

02.09.01

Oral presentation

How does collaboration between academia and practitioners contribute to the development of professional practice?

Petra Graf
Denise Schmid

Description

Background

Since 2008, contractual agreements between universities of applied sciences and practice institutions have been in place for the provision of practice-based learning for undergraduate midwives. These agreements are based on the concept of ‘collective impact’, which implies successful collaboration1. Continuous revision and optimisation contributes to such structured collaboration2,3, which can also impact the quality of perinatal care2, 4, 5.

Research question

Does structured collaboration between practice institutions and universities contribute to an optimal quality of education and training and, in so doing, improve clinical midwifery?

Method

Both contractual parties regularly evaluated the educational and training standards, and mapped out development needs and common challenges of the programmes.

Results

Collaborative partnerships for the academic and practice-based learning of undergraduate midwives attained a high standard of quality6.

Both students and clinical supervisors reported that implementing evidence-based knowledge was a practical challenge. The ‘theory-practice-theory’ transfer was also described as demanding. Furthermore, due to the day-to-day challenges arising in clinical practice, new content which had been taught at the universities of applied sciences (eg ‘clinical assessment’, was slow to be applied in everyday practice).

Conclusion

Cyclical quality meetings between universities of applied sciences and practice institutions are important because on the one hand they facilitate working towards common goals to optimise the education and training of midwives and on the other hand they can have a positive impact on perinatal care.

Universities and practice institutions should collaborate more closely in the future to strengthen specific profiles at the interface of academia and clinical practice and promote dual competencies profiles in junior staff7,8. There should also be a coordinated division of responsibilities to bridge differences in financial processes, objectives, cultures and priorities9.

Further research is needed to be able to determine the impact of optimal ‘academia-practice partnerships’ as well as parameters for practice developments.

Petra Graf

02.09.02

Oral presentation

What’s the added value in developing facilitation and leadership capacity?

Christine Boomer

Description

Aim: To share one organisations review of a programme aimed at developing facilitation and leadership.

Background: The practice development and professional literature emphasises the need for facilitators and leaders in the drive for person-centred cultures. Over the years there has been much debate on the best way to develop staff in this area. A practice-based facilitation and leadership module has been delivered aiming to enable staff to flourish as facilitators and leaders for development of practice and staff. The module introduces participants to key themes in facilitation, leadership, adult learning, knowing self, and how this links with practice development and enabling person-centred cultures. Within an outcome focused agenda it is important we can demonstrate the value and contribution activities have for our staff, our patients and services.

Method: To ascertain the value in terms of impact from the module, evaluation data from all the modules completed to date (n=8) was reviewed using descriptive statistics and creative hermeneutic analysis (Boomer and McCormack 2010).

Findings: This work remains on-going, to be completed March 2018. To date 75% (n= 64 out of 86 who commenced) have fully completed the module, with another 16 on this year’s programme (to complete March 2018). While not an explicit intent of the module, it is encouraging that 24 participants (38%) have subsequently gained promotion or changed roles to one where leadership and facilitation are key aspects of the job. While many participants commence not seeing self as either leaders or facilitators they leave transformed, rising to new challenges. A key element within the programme is the development of self-awareness and this has enabled participants to view themselves through a different lens; to understand how their attitudes and behaviours can affect others and practice, the result being that many actively use this raised consciousness in leading practice development.

Christine Boomer

Christine Boomer